SWAMP THING EPISODE S1, Ep3 “HE SPEAKS” – REVIEW 6/14/19

After Swamp Thing revealed himself to Susie Coyle while saving her and killing her pursuer by ripping him apart, she told Abbie that he said that his name was Alec, which shocks her. The episode begins with a bizarre dream sequence of Alec seeing himself and Munson who he killed and he feels guilty for it. While Abbie wrestles with the new revelation that Alec could be alive, another CDC doctor arrives at the hospital to take over, but her friend Harlan contracts the disease as well. As we are introduced to the eccentric Dr. Woodrue, we also learn that his wife is suffering from some form of Alzheimer’s. Then when Abbie goes to Alec’s lab to try and learn more about what he found, she is confronted by the reanimated corpse of Munson, as well as Swamp Thing in person who saves her. After her encounter with Swamp Thing, he gives her the idea about the nature of the mysterious disease that is plaguing Marais. Later we get to learn more about Avery’s plans for Marais and his not-so-noble intentions regarding the swamp.

This episode really ramps up the horror elements as we see Munson’s body being swarmed and reanimated by insects, as well as Maria seeing visions of her dead daughter Shawna speaking to her from beyond the grave. The dark and supernatural elements harken back to the iconic days of writer Alan Moore’s stint on “Swamp Thing” during the 1980s. The ‘bug zombie’ is truly terrifying in this episode and the fight between it and Swamp Thing is especially exciting. As the title suggests, we also get to hear Swamp Thing speak as he protects Abbie from the ‘bug zombie’ and uses his newfound abilities to “release” Munson’s soul/spirit from the control of the disgusting insects.

Swamp Thing Episode #102 “Worlds Apart” – Review

After the pilot of “Swamp Thing” the latest streaming show from DC Universe shows much promise as they delve into a darker and more horror-oriented drama, but unfortunately as I will address later in the review. This show, while hopeful is fated to be short-lived.

Following the alleged death of Alec Holland in the swamp at the hands of an unknown assailant, Dr. Abby Arcane and the Marais sheriff’s department conduct a search for his remains. While Susie Coyle remains in the hospital, two more cases of the illness have been reported. And while the Swamp Thing emerges from the swamp and struggles to understand what has happened to him, Susie has an episode and seems to be somehow connected to the creature. And later, while Abby searches for clues as to what Alec was working on, she reluctantly approaches Avery Sunderland, who she hopes can provide her access to his lab. But when Susie goes missing from the hospital, Abby and Matt Cable follow her trail into the swamp, where she encounters a human monster as well as the Swamp Thing. Now as the plot thickens, the mysteries of the plant accelerant formula and Alec Holland’s fate are revealed.

As the second episode begins we finally get a fairly good look at the Swap Thing, and he is most impressive. No more B-grade rubber suits or overly campy performances, this is the Swamp Thing as he was meant to be. The costume, along with prosthetics and CGI effects are very realistic and add an otherworldliness to him that is very believable.

Also with this episode we are introduced to two new characters who will no doubt become an integral part to the story. One being the blind mystic Madame Xanadu (played by Jeryl Prescott), whose character has been a part of the DC comics magical world with characters such as the Spectre and Phantom Stranger since 1978. Also introduced is the botanist Dr. Jason Woodrue (played by Kevin Durand), who, without spoiling anything about his character, DC Comics fans will instantly recognize but who was previously but limitedly played by John Glover in Batman & Robin (1997). There’s even an appearance by Dan Cassidy (played by Ian Ziering) who fans will also know by another name, as the ‘Blue Devil’ but in a much different incarnation.

Overall, this show is slowly building up characters and backstories, but also doing a great job of adding both supernatural thrills and suspense that fans will come to expect. There is a particular two very horrifying scenes where Madame Xanadu tries a voodoo-like séance with Maria Sunderland (Virginia Madsen) and we also get to see a fairly bloody display of Swamp Thing’s powers in the climax of the episode.

On another note, before the airing of this episode, viewers received some shocking news that may have come to soon and which also may bring detriment to the future of the show and its continued audience. On June 4th, rumors spread on the internet that the new “Swamp Thing” series was in fact Cancelled! As more details emerged, the company announced that after filming had ended on the first season, that there will be no second season, due to a combination of production troubles, corporate bureaucracy, and money, along with the uncertain future of the DC Universe streaming service with the upcoming AT&T’s Warner Media streaming service. Before “Swamp Thing” emerged from the swamp it seems as if his fate was sealed with a $100 billion deal. Much like 2014’s “Constantine” TV show on NBC, which was also canceled after one season. The character of John Constantine (perfectly played by Matt Ryan) was able to live on in CW’s “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow.” While it seems DC has always had a problem with their darker heroes, their more mainstream characters such as Green Arrow, Flash and Supergirl, have prospered on the CW Television Network. As for the other original shows on DC Universe like “Titans and “Doom Patrol,” their futures seem just as uncertain. I for one will continue to watch and review “Swamp Thing” for the next 8 episodes and hope that soon, after the fans on the internet have spoken, “Swamp Thing” will return!

Swamp Thing Episode #101, Pilot – Review

With the launch of DC Universe streaming service, DC Entertainment and Warner Bros., have produced a few original programs that feature exclusively on the digital platform. Along with its live-action series “Titans” and “Doom Patrol,” the highly anticipated “Swamp Thing” has finally been released this month. Having been announced last year along with “Doom Patrol,” this is the second attempt to bring the character of Swamp Thing to the small screen. Since the character’s creation in 1971 by writer Len Wein (Marvel’s Wolverine) and artist Bernie Wrightson (“House of Secrets”), the character has appeared in two low budget films in the 1980s, a live-action series on the USA Network that ran from 1990 to 1993, and a short-lived animated series in 1991, with an accompanying action figure line. For the most part, the dramatic adaptations of Swamp Thing have been disappointingly B-grade and overly campy attempts to truly represent the character, until now.

Upon the release of the first episode of “Swamp Thing” on DC Universe, the popular humanoid-plant creature returns to it’s horror roots and its intended incarnation in this dark and dramatic web television series. Created and executive produced by screenwriter Gary Dauberman, comic book writer Mark Verheiden and director James Wan (“Aquaman“), this new show hopes to do justice to one of the most unusual character’s of the DC Comics Universe.

When Dr. Abby Arcane (Crystal Reed) of the CDC returns to her hometown of Marais (pronounced Ma-ray), Louisiana, to investigate a mysterious and deadly epidemic that is spreading throughout the bayou town, she meets an eccentric scientist named Alec Holland (Andy Bean), who is also trying to find the source of this swamp-borne pathogen. While Abby reconnects with her old friends, including Matthew Cable, a police officer and Liz Tremayne, a local bartender and reporter, she also runs into the mother of her college friend, Shawna Sunderland, who still bears a grudge against her for her involvement with her daughter’s accidental death.
As Abby and Alec join forces to find the cause of the disease, they find the decayed body of Coyle, a local fisherman, whose daughter has been hospitalized after contracting the sickness, who has been covered inside and out with strange plants and vines. As they come closer to finding out the origin of the contagion, Abby learns that Alec was once a prominent biologist, who was disgraced by the scientific community. But when Alec gets too close to finding out the truth, he is murdered by an unknown assailant and left for dead in the murky swamp.

While many are familiar with the character of Swamp Thing, especially due to his resurgence in the 1980’s with the work of British comic book writer Alan Moore (“Watchmen”, “V for Vendetta”), he has been rarely seen in the DC Comics universe since his series relaunched as part of the “New 52” from 2011 to 2015, plus a six-part miniseries in 2016, written by Len Wein and art by Kelley Jones (one of my favorite artists). The DC Universe service seems ripe to debut the latest incarnation of the character. Although unfortunately, both the creators died in 2017, this show will hopefully honor their creation and present a fresh, new perspective on a character that has been through so many incarnations over the years. And with visionary horror director James Wan (“Saw,” “The Conjuring”) on the production team, along with character/creature actor Derek Mears (“Friday the 13th”,”Predators”) portraying the Swamp Thing creature, this dark and suspenseful show is sure to blossom forth. The vine and plant CGI effects are impressive, and the first episode did a good job of building the main characters, particularly Abby and Alec. The transformation/creation sequence for Swamp Thing was considerably disturbing and shocking, but very effective. I am looking forward to the continuation of this series by next Friday.

Titans Episode Review S01: E09

Welp, let’s chalk another one up in the “I-stand-corrected” column that started with Episode 8 of Titans — though this instance of correction is much less pleasing than the previous one. If you journey back to my review of Episode 2, “Hawk and Dove”, you’ll read that I quite liked the dynamic between Hank and Dawn, the committed couple that had a penchant for vigilante justice. Their dialogue wasn’t the greatest, but the relationship felt sincere and came as nice distraction from the then already strained focus on Dick and Rachel. I remarked that I would “very much enjoy seeing their evolution as people – provided the writers felt up to the task.” Unbeknownst to me, the best time to insert that evolution — a fairly thin version of it at that — was in the middle of the season’s climax.

Episode 9, titled “Hank and Dawn”, seemingly abandons what felt like a pretty important event to return to where we last left the couple. Hank is mourning over a now comatose Dawn, and the show takes this as the opportune time for a flashback. It’s here where we’re given glimpses into the duo’s past, with Hank’s relationship with his brother taking up the majority of it. The results of this journey into the past are mixed at best; and while its placement in the season certainly bares some of the blame for that, the biggest culprit is a lazy and predictable script.

The episode starts off promisingly as we’re treated to some heavy backstory for Hank and his younger brother, Don, that really fleshes out Hank’s character. The struggles he endures adds a nice layer and new meaning to the man’s showboat bravado. Even Dawn gets a neat intro — though the details are haphazardly tossed around — that shows more of her dominant-yet-caring nature and her upbringing. All good things must come to an end, however, and that “end” happens to come at the halfway-point of the episode. The transition is shocking and, in more concerned hands, could have been a hard segue into a very introspective and painful third act. In actuality, it ends up being nothing more than just shocking.

From there, the script abandons its straight-forward character building in favor of a crudely-structured attempt at catharsis. The final half of the episode tries to explain what brings our two “love-birds” (sorry) together, but it ends up being very rushed and borderline laughable. If you thought the Kory/ Dick sex-scene was cringe-worthy, you’re in for a real treat. Nothing says “mood-setting” like beating up pedophiles.

In terms of how this episode relates to the main plot, it’s hard to say. There’s very little going on here that ties into current-timeline Titans, aside from a few brief appearances of Rachel in the form of “dream-visions”, but what significance these appearances have remains to be seen. In any case, the groundwork they lay is interesting.

Two episodes. There are two episodes left in Season 1 of Titans. Why then, I ask you, are we still doing these off-shoot episodes? Frankly, this feels more like a pilot for a Hawk and Dove show than it does an episode of Titans; and while that’s certainly an enticing prospect, it doesn’t belong here. What’s worse is that they don’t even get a full, proper treatment. As enjoyable as the first half of the episode is, the goodwill built by it and Episode 2 is squandered in the second half for no payoff. The two eponymous characters feel worse off, and the momentum that the main plot gained from the previous episode has now slowed to a crawl.

5/10

Titans is released every Friday only on DCUniverse!

Titans Episode Review S01: E07

Episode 7 of Titans — or “Asylum” — is a strange product. Along with “Together”, it’s probably a pretty good representation of what the show will be if it ever decides to actually be a show about the Titans, rather than a show about Dick Grayson. Yet it’s also more evidence for how truly thin the show’s plot is, despite it having so much potential.

The episode starts off on the right foot. We get a bit of insight from Adamson concerning what he and his group want with Rachel, as well as the knowledge that her mother (original, not adoptive) is alive and being held captive in a secret facility. Following this, mistakes are made, and the quartet find themselves captured and subjected to various types of torture.

This is where the episode starts to devolve. Kory and Gar are once again shortchanged in favor of a larger focus being placed on how these events affect Rachel and Dick, the prior of which at least makes sense in the context of the episode. We’re starting to see glimpses of what a confident Raven looks like and how her powers can be more than just a cloud of evil smoke. The methodical evolving of her character into a quietly terrifying force of nature is truly gripping and probably the high-point of the episode, if only because Gar’s development didn’t have the proper foundation leading into it. In fact, Episode 7 is a true testament to just how much Beast Boy has been neglected by the writers, squandering a truly devastating character arc for him in the process. The result of his torture is tragic and will likely last past the end of the first season, but the gravity of this is at odds with how little attention is paid towards it.

It’s still better than Kory being merely relegated to the body-horror portion of the proceedings. She gains nothing from the pain she endures, except for possibly the knowledge that she can heal quickly; but this isn’t “character development”, it’s “power development”. In reality, she’s just laying on a table for the majority of the episode. It’s like if Eli Roth did a “made-for-TV” movie; there’s no ultimate rhyme or reason for this character to suffer the way she does. That’s not a larger point being made either — like “sometimes there is no reason” — because everyone else has some sort of an attempt at character development accompanying their imprisonment. Even if Dick’s is the same thing they’ve been telling us for what seems like A THOUSAND EPISODES, there is still an objective at play.

And while all of this results in a neat climax, it kind of feels like any of the build we had for the show’s antagonist — what little there was — was just tossed aside. This seems like a definitive end to a story arc, which is incredibly confusing and unsatisfying. The show needed to have started really hammering us with a true villain two weeks ago, and instead, it looks like we’ll be starting from square one next week. I am legitimately stumped as to how we’re expected to have any sort of investment in a singular villain going forward. Why even bother at this point? If the show is really supposed to be what I felt like last week’s episode was (“Monster-of-the-Week”), then it should just lean into that. Don’t attempt this quasi-vacuum experiment in which the larger narrative only matters occasionally because, the fact of the matter is, the season isn’t long enough to do that.

Titans has so much potential, and every episode offers passing moments of that potential being realized. Which makes it so frustrating when the show continues to waste it so wantonly. This feels like such an easy fix, but it’s so ingrained at this point that it would take drastic measures to properly course-correct. For crying out loud, Dick Grayson is the main character of ANOTHER EPISODE next week! This show is called Titans, right?

5/10

Titans is released every Friday only on DCUniverse!

Titans Episode Review: S01: E06

Another week, another new episode of Titans. This episode, titled (rather unceremoniously) “Jason Todd”, picks up immediately after the closing moments of the last. Focusing almost entirely on the new and strained relationship between Old-Robin, a.k.a. Dick Grayson, and New-Robin, a.k.a. Jason Todd, the episode follows the duo as they attempt to track down a serial killer who has a penchant for acid-baths, and as luck would have it, his sights are set on Dick. Kory, Rachel, and Gar make minimal appearances, though they do contribute a few good laughs.

First, let me just say that I did, overall, like this episode. It focuses on one major conflict, with that conflict being character driven, and nearly every action serves the purpose of pushing that conflict to its logical conclusion. It’s well-crafted, it’s evenly-paced, and it’s engaging. Curran Walters turns in a performance as Jason Todd that is decidedly his own, albeit a tad cheesy. The character is clear foil to Dick Grayson, and Walters uses a style that is both energetic and laissez-faire to accentuate that idea. While Dick is generally contemplative and solemn about his upbringing as Bruce Wayne’s ward, Jason is outwardly excited and grateful for it. Whether or not Bruce does more harm than good with his adoption and subsequent use of orphans in his fight against crime is not a new line of debate, but it’s still effective and, in this instance, boiled down to the important talking points.

All of this introspection, however, is to the detriment of the episode’s villain. He serves no purpose other than to continue the “Monster-of-the-Week”-formula that is still severely crippling the show, and the climax of the whole thing is such a one-note affair that you could practically sleep through it without missing a beat. This isn’t anything new to the narrative strategy that the writers have taken with the show, but at least with earlier episodes it was still vaguely connected to the overall plot. With both the character development and active threat being almost entirely removed from the show’s main story, what exactly does this episode contribute?

At this point, the show is on its second half, and as such, we should be building towards a central threat and, ultimately, a satisfying conclusion. Yet, I find myself asking this week, “What purpose does this serve?” Why is it that, with no proper antagonist other than the vaguely defined “Them” referenced by Anderson in Episode 5, we’ve devoted a whole episode to saying, once again, “Dick doesn’t like Batman.” That is, perhaps, an oversimplification of the internal struggle that Dick goes through when faced with his replacement and what it means to him; but at the end of the day, it’s a development that doesn’t fit in the spot it’s been given. This would have worked better either earlier in Season 1 or at the beginning of Season 2. Make no mistake, in a vacuum, Episode 6 is one of the better episodes of the series thus far. However, as a piece of a larger story, it never manages to become anything more than filler.

7/10

Titans is released every Friday only on DCUniverse!

Titans Episode Review S01: E05

It’s been an interesting road for Titans up until now. With eleven episodes planned for the season, Episode 5 — or “Together” — marks the closest thing to a “half-way point” the show is going to have. So how does that point fare? Well, it’s nothing spectacular, but it does at least continue the trend of being “potato chips” (take a look at my review for Episode 4, if that throws you for a loop). That being said, there is one major slip-up that the episode makes that could very well irreparably damage the show as whole.

Before we get too carried away, however, let’s recap. Following a series of events, which include but are not limited to both blowing up a church and meeting a fully cognizant robot, all of our main players are now in one place. Dick takes this as an opportunity for the “team” become more familiar with their own abilities. There’s only one problem: a renewed Nuclear Family is hot on their trail. Suffice it to say, the results are explosive.

So let’s start with the good. First, the show is immensely more enjoyable when it has everyone in one spot. It feels more organic when a character is allowed to focus on more than one problem, something that becomes easier the more people someone can interact with. Granted, everyone sort of gets the short end of the stick compared to Dick Grayson, but they still have different stories building at the same time. Frankly, it adds some nuance to the decidedly straight-forward proceedings.

Without getting too close to spoilers, the choreography in this episode is quite good as well. Unlike the infamous alleyway fight from Episode 1, movement doesn’t feel as jerky or sped-up here. Camera cuts are fast, but not so fast as to be confusing. There is a slight dip in quality midway through one fight scene…a dip that, at least in terms of what this point entails, doesn’t really make a whole lot of narrative sense. However, even that is miles ahead of what we’ve seen up until now, and the quality also ramps back up after a brief interlude.

Now, what about the bad? Well perhaps the most pressing is that, at this point, the show seems to be meandering quite a bit. After Episode 3, it felt like we were on the cusp of getting some sort of answers, and I forgave the slow build-up to that point because of course you can’t have everything all at once. Yet, two episodes later, and we really don’t have any new knowledge in terms of the larger, overarching plot. On top of that, it doesn’t seem like the show even knows how or when it’s going to divulge something critical. The whole affair is somewhat of a confusing mess, and it feels like the writers are just going to keep stringing us along until Episode 9.

And as for my not-at-all-hyperbolic position of the show being in ruins due to ONE decision? Well, depending on who you ask, it may not be as doom-and-gloom as that, but it is indicative of a larger problem in terms of character-building. There is one interaction between two characters that, if you know anything about the source material, is not exactly a surprise, but is also done so haphazardly and hastily that you might get whiplash from seeing it. This is something, that if played right, would have been an easy home-run — something so expected yet hoped-for that it wouldn’t have mattered if it didn’t have the best lead-up. Instead, the writers opted for NO lead-up whatsoever. It’s a nonchalant rush to the finish, and it makes about as much sense as that phrase.

So, yes, Episode 5 is a glimpse at what the entire show is leading to — a fully-functioning Titans squad — and that’s very exciting. Despite all of the show’s problems when it comes to its script, CG, or just acting in general, it still knows how to relish in the fun of finally throwing all of its heroes together (sorry, I couldn’t resist). However, it still can’t seem to get past its extremely lacking writing quality and character development. In earlier episodes, it was just something to hopefully chalk up to growing pains, but as we approach that 60%-mark, the show desperately needs to find something to give us that’s more worthwhile than just, “These are the Teen Titans you know…with a twist!”

6/10

Titans is released every Friday only on DCUniverse!

Titans Episode Review S01: E04

Titans is quickly becoming the television equivalent of potato chips; there’s no substance and it’s not very good for you, but it’s pretty tasty and I would definitely eat two family-sized bags in one sitting if DC let me. To that end, while Episode 4 of the series — titled “Doom Patrol” — is still good, it does feel like it somewhat wastes the momentum the show had coming out of Episode 3.

Jumping in, Rachel has just blown up a convent (subtle, eh?) that was holding her captive and is now running through its backyard-forest. Soon, she’s intercepted by Gar Logan, a.k.a. Beast Boy, who takes her to his home to hide out. It’s here where we’re introduced to a ragtag bunch of misfits who are hiding out to avoid persecution for their physical abnormalities. Those who know better will recognize these characters as Robotman, Negative Man, and Elastic Girl.

I really enjoyed the banter and lighter tone that this partial Doom Patrol lent to the episode, and I think Geoff Johns (the episode’s sole writer) did what he could to keep it enjoyable while very minimally pushing the narrative forward. And while, yes, there is very little of consequence that occurs throughout the hour-long run-time, I get why it had to happen this way. At least while nothing was happening, most of the dialogue (that wasn’t coming out of Dick Grayson’s mouth) was fun. It seems fairly obvious that the Doom Patrol series that’s slated for 2019 will most likely take a few cues from Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy films (honestly, what ensemble-driven media isn’t?), but hey, if it works — which in this case, it does — I say go for it.

Jokes and unlikely companions can only do so much, however, and that’s a lot of heavy lifting for, admittedly, fairly weak concepts. No matter how effective such tertiary details are, any problems with the primary events are going to somewhat overshadow them. That’s not to say that this episode is bad — far from it. It has a decently intriguing plot and it’s probably the best episode in terms of “pace” so far. However, much of it is just sort of “fluff”. Rachel feeling confident enough to voluntarily use her powers is certainly an interesting development, but that 30-second exchange is essentially the biggest take away from the episode until the VERY end. Even that ending borders on amounting to nothing because it’s something that anyone who has a passing understanding of the property, or even someone who has only ever seen Teen Titans Go! To the Movies, knows is going to happen at some point.

Additionally, the show-runners are going to have to come up with different things for Rachel to do other than the same thing she’s be doing for four episodes now. Her entire narrative up to this point can be summed up by this sequence: girl is upset and skeptical of new person, girl learns to trust, girl shows kindness despite being literally possessed by Evil incarnate, girl finds herself restrained or in a situation in which she must now use her dark powers, girl learns that maybe you shouldn’t trust EVERYONE. Lather, rinse, repeat. Thankfully, it does look like we’ll be switching gears starting in the next episode, but for the good of the show, this formula needs to go away for a very long time.

When it’s all said and done, however, I do think the show has finally hit its stride. While it’s not as bombastic and tense as the previous episode, Episode 4 is still very enjoyable even when nothing is really happening. As long as these chips keep tasting this good, I’ll keep stuffing my face.

7/ 10

Titans is released every Friday only on DCUniverse!

Titans Episode Review S01: E03

“Third time’s a charm,” or so they say, and the third episode of Titans, titled “Origins” makes a pretty solid argument in favor of that. DCUniverse’s premier “belle-of-the-ball” had a bit of a rocky start, but it seems to have, thankfully, begun its upswing. Episode 3 still has a few problems, but they’re minor and ultimately inconsequential.

In “Origins”, we pick up immediately where we left off at the end of Episode 2, with the fallout of The Nuclear Family’s attack on our heroes being the jumping point. From there, however, the show starts to dive into what seems to be the crux of the season, “Who is Rachel Roth?” While much of the info that we’re given isn’t exactly new for comic fans, it is nonetheless exciting to be exploring a central plot and committing to moving the story forward.

While it abandons the more focused lens that was present in Episode 2 in favor of returning to showcasing multiple team members, the direction doesn’t feel as hectic and scattered as it did in Episode 1 either. Nothing feels out of place or random, and transitions between characters are much more cohesive. This makes for a good pace and the episode never really feels like it’s dragging.

The last two episodes haven’t done much in terms of forward momentum, but Episode 3 really pushes the narrative; it’s very much a welcome relief to be moving away from thin exposition. Plot details come fast and characters feel fully realized, rather than the vague, one-note standees that they have been. Motivations make sense, reactions are understandable, and everyone finally takes a beat to somewhat digest the situation with the viewer.

Much of the plot movement can be attributed to Kory Anders (a.k.a. Starfire) being present in a more significant way and not just murdering some Russian thugs. Anna Diop’s off-kilter, amnesiac version of the character is a little strange at first, but the approach is different and promises something interesting for the future. In fact, all three of the main characters that are on display in Episode 3 (Beast Boy only makes a brief appearance, once again) are at their best in terms effectiveness. Dick gets the short end of the stick, but he does get some interesting flashbacks that further flesh out his childhood.

It’s not all perfect – the horrendous CG makes a return appearance and even somehow manages to be laughable this time around. Think Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, which came out in 2001, and that’s the quality we’re getting now – with a new show – in 2018. The script is still tripping over itself as well, though the cringe-worthy dialog isn’t as prevalent as it has been. At some points, it actually seems to relish in the idea of being in so-bad-it’s-good territory, but overall, hits somewhere between “serviceable” and “inoffensive”.

None of this was bad enough to make me stop watching, however, or even make me stop enjoying myself. If the rest of Titans is at least the minimum quality that Episode 3 has established, there’s a lot to look forward to every Friday now.

8/10

Titans is released every Friday only on DCUniverse!