Comic Review – The Flash #33

The Justice League has faced many strange threats in their time together, but the so-called Dark Knights may be the greatest threat yet. Seven alternate-universe versions of Batman with all of his training and none of his morals, each one empowered in the same manner as another member of The Justice League!

In the case of Barry Allen, The Fastest Man Alive, he is countered by The Red Death – a version of Bruce Wayne who, as part of a desperate attempt to save his Earth, killed his world’s version of The Flash in order to steal his powers. However, this action corrupted The Speed Force within him and now The Red Death drains the life energy from the bodies of those around him as he runs.

With The Red Death laying waste to Central City, The Flash is desperate to head home and face his dark doppelganger. But The Justice League needs his help to save the world at large. Specifically, they need him to help Superman breach the barrier between realities so that he can find their Batman while the rest of The League seek out more of the strange metals that are the only thing that can hurt the Batmen of the Dark Multiverse. Thankfully, Barry Allen is good at multitasking and making up for lost time. Unfortunately, The Dark Knights are on the move and two of them are sent to make Barry Allen The Fastest Man Dead!

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This Dark Nights Metal tie-in comes at a rather odd time for The Flash. The last issue, #32, started a new story-line with several on-going subplots moving forward. Among these were Barry Allen’s difficulties in controlling his powers following the latest attack by The Reverse Flash, Iris West pushing him away in the wake of her killing The Reverse Flash to save him and his starting a new job as a staff CSI at Iron Heights Prison.

None of this is addressed in this issue, with the exception of Barry talking to Iris for the first time in a long while. It’s a minor point and part and parcel of comic-book crossovers. Still, it does raise questions about just when Bats Out Of Hell takes place relative to the stories in the books tying in to Dark Nights Metal. It also takes the wind out of the sails regarding the current story in The Flash and right after a great jumping-on issue for new readers!

The Flash #33 works somewhat better as a Dark Nights Metal tie-in. Joshua Williamson’s script does a great job of explaining the story to date and catching-up those Flash fans who might not have been reading the crossover. Unfortunately, despite a sense of urgency to the story and Barry running himself ragged for most of the issue, there’s little in the way of actual action. The story here is primarily concerned with exposition and setting up the next big challenge and it manages that task well.

Thankfully, Howard Porter does a fantastic job of depicting what action there is. Porter’s run on JLA with Grant Morrison twenty years ago is still fondly remembered and Porter’s work has only grown stronger since then. The colors by Hi-Fi are brilliantly applied, with a variety of palettes in play as the settings shift. The only real artistic weak-spot lies in the lettering, with the dialogue of The Batman Who Laughs nearly unreadable, rendered as it is with dark red text on a black background.

The Flash #33 is a fantastic continuation of Dark Nights Metal but isn’t a good representation of what the series is usually like. Despite featuring the same great writing and artwork as the usual bi-monthly book, most of the story elements that make The Flash unique are missing here. Those who are curious about what Barry Allen’s comic adventures are usually like would do well to check out The Flash #32 or wait two weeks for The Flash #34.

9/10.


Written by The Critic The Internet Deserves, but not the one it needs right now…. Matt Morrison. He’s a smart-ass guardian. A sarcastic protector. A Snark Knight.

Comic Review – Dark Nights: Metal #3

There is nothing Batman hates more than a mystery. He became a master detective, not because he relishes solving a puzzle, but because he cannot bear to be ignorant. That was to be his downfall and the downfall of the multiverse.

Because Batman could not leave well enough alone, his efforts to solve a mystery tied into the ancient Court of Owls who had manipulated him all of his life and Gotham City for generations led to Bruce Wayne becoming the gateway to somewhere dark… a multiverse made up of all the worlds where the heroes were a second too late. Where the good guys became greater monsters than the villains they fought. Where evil triumphed in the end and the world fell into oblivion.

Seven Dark Knights came forth. Seven versions of Bruce Wayne that fell to the darkness. Seven versions of Bruce Wayne who had been denied the light and were determined to see it destroyed…

 

Dark Nights: Metal #3 Page 1 Dark Nights: Metal #3 Page 2 Dark Nights: Metal #3 Page 3

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Building off the mythology established in their now legendary run on Batman, it should be no surprise that Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo have delivered a story as epic as any we could have imagined with Dark Nights: Metal. The most truly miraculous aspect of this third issue, however, is how accessible it is to any reader who failed to pick up the first two issues. Every aspect of the story so far is explained, from how Batman’s actions have caused the current crisis to the events of the related Gotham Resistance story line that ran through the Teen Titans, Nightwing, Suicide Squad and Green Arrow series. It’s a novel touch and one more mini-series should indulge in for the benefit of those readers who were late to the party but don’t want to wait for the trade paperback collection.

Scott Snyder’s script for this issue is a masterwork, easily introducing obscure new characters such as The Nightmaster and Detective Chimp into the narrative with no fuss, muss or confusion at all. While much of the issue is concerned with exposition and setting up the next series of action events, the dialogue masks that fact very well and it’s amusing to read all the characters playing off of one another.

Greg Capullo is also at the top of his game here. Capullo has altered his usual penciling style somewhat, forging a new aesthetic inspired by the works of Frank Frazetta. Despite the generally dark coloration and heavy inks (courtesy of FCO Plascencia and Jonathan Glapion respectively), the general appearance of the book is surprisingly uncluttered. The artwork is detailed yet the line work is largely light and breezy. The colors stand out all the more vividly despite the general muted tone of the finished artwork. One particularly noteworthy aspect is the effects used to create the illusion of flickering firelight on a still page.

Bottom Line – if you haven’t been reading Dark Knights Metal, it isn’t too late to jump in on what will likely be the best event comic of 2017.

10/10


Written by The Critic The Internet Deserves, but not the one it needs right now…. Matt Morrison. He’s a smart-ass guardian. A sarcastic protector. A Snark Knight.