Comic Review – Catwoman/Tweety & Sylvester Special #1

Catwoman Tweety Sylvester Special 1 Cover

It seems obvious that the recent rush of Hanna-Barbera and Looney Tunes crossover books was motivated more by marketing than good sense. One can picture some junior executive in the Warner Brothers offices trying to sell his bosses on the idea… ‘We own the cartoon characters!  We own the superheroes!  We put them together! It’s gold!’ Or it would be if the average kid today read comic books or remembered the Looney Tunes characters.

Despite this and the general comic reading audience’s refusal to take this sort of thing seriously, some writers managed to pan gold out of the premise. Batman/Elmer Fudd was a neat Film Noir thriller that turned everyone’s favorite hunter into a hired gun in Gotham City. The Snagglepuss Chronicles used Hanna Barbera’s animal characters to spin a complex tale of repression in the age of McCarthyism. And someone has got to be buying Scooby Apocalypse for it to have lasted over two years.

Catwoman Tweety Sylvester Special 1 Page 1

This brings us to Catwoman/Tweety & Sylvester Special #1 – a book which opens with a witches convention and a wager between Witch Hazel and The Kindly Ones as to what is the more witchy animal – birds or cats. This leads to Sylvester and Tweety being sent into the DC Universe and having one night to seek out a champion as they settle the matter once and for all, with the stakes being “reality as they know it!” And the lives of every bird or cat in the universe, along with any superhero and super-villain with a bird or cat theme.

‘No prethure’, as Sylvester would thay.

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Whoever had the idea for this story, I know the title had to have been conceived by one of the aforementioned marketing weasels because they buried the lead. Yes, Catwoman is in this story. So are Tweety and Sylvester. But none of the promotional material for this book mentioned one very important fact: Black Canary is in it.

Oh, I’m well aware that the general public knows who Catwoman is far better than they know who Black Canary is and that she has more star power as it were. But if you wanted to make some serious clams selling this book to people who buy comics, all you need to say is that Gail Simone is writing Black Canary again and watch the Birds of Prey fans come running.

Catwoman Tweety Sylvester Special 1 Page 2

Certainly DC Comics fans will get the most value out of this book, if only for the fun of spotting all the references artist Inaki Miranda snuck into the background. Those who don’t enjoy this sort of game will have to content themselves with the well-written story and gorgeous artwork that somehow finds a way to translate a Tweety and Sylvester brawl into a more realistic art style. Not to mention the amazing colors of Eva De La Cruz!

So even if you’re not the sort of person who likes “funny animal” books, Catwoman/Tweety & Sylvester Special #1 is well worth checking out.  And if you are the sort of person who likes “funny animal” books, you’ll love the back-up story, told in a traditional Looney Tunes animation style, where Tweety has to defend Granny’s home from Catwoman.

10/10

Catwoman/Tweety & Sylvester #1 releases on August 29, 2018!


Written by The Critic The Internet Deserves, but not the one it needs right now…. Matt Morrison. He’s a smart-ass guardian. A sarcastic protector. A Snark Knight.

Batman #50 Catwoman #1 Banner

Comic Review – Batman #50 & Catwoman #1

Batman #50 Cover

There is no real way to review Catwoman #1 without also discussing Batman #50 and the long awaited wedding of Bruce Wayne and Selina Kyle. The one informs the other, as the cover of Catwoman #1 helpfully informs the reader that they should read Batman #50 before opening it up.

This proves ironic, given that The New York Times spoiled the story of Batman #50 three days before it ever hit the shops! Despite this, I will endeavor to dance around any major spoilers in both books as best I can.

As a tribute to the relationship of Batman and Catwoman and the history of the two characters, Batman #50 is a smashing success, with much of the issue being devoted to Bruce and Selina’s thoughts about one another as we are treated to a historical montage of sorts, illustrated one page at a time, by some of the greatest Batman artists of all time.

As an actual story, however, Batman #50 doesn’t quite work. It’s anticlimactic, to put it mildly. The pageantry far outweighs the actual event. To put it plainly, this book isn’t worth the hype that has been invested in it.

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Don’t get me wrong. Batman #50 is a beautiful book and there’s some poster-worthy artwork. Even the main story, as illustrated by Mikel Janin looks fantastic. Yet those who have a low tolerance for Tom King’s style of writing, where consistency of character is sacrificed for the sake of the story he wants to tell (as in his recent story where Booster Gold was turned into a complete idiot for the sake of a dark comedy), will not enjoy themselves here.

Ultimately, Batman #50 is a spectacle and nothing more. If you enjoy collectible covers and fine art, it’s well worth picking up. As an actual book, unfortunately, it leaves a lot to be desired.

4/10.


Catwoman #1 CoverThere is a cruel irony that Catwoman #1 should be so closely tied to Batman #50. Much like how Selina Kyle is so much more interesting as a solo act than when she when she is joined at the hip to Bruce Wayne, so too is this book at its best when it is separated from its ties to Batman #50.

Thankfully, those ties are dealt with early on and we are soon thrown into a high-action adventure, where Selina Kyle is suddenly a wanted woman. It seems that some woman in a cat-suit is killing cops and the police are targeting the most obvious suspect, having also somehow learned Selina’s secret identity!

This is apparently the work of a mysterious new enemy named Riana Creel, whose motivations and reasons for holding a grudge against Catwoman are unclear. Raina is a striking character whose presence immediately grips you and it will be interesting to see her developed in the coming issues.

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Joelle Jones spins a wonderful first issue, which, apart from the first few pages, stands strongly on its own terms, much like Catwoman herself. The artwork – also by Jones – is utterly amazing, with Laura Allred’s colors and Josh Reed’s letters providing the perfect finishes. The story flows naturally and smoothly from panel to panel and its hard to imagine any artist who was better born to draw Catwoman in action than Joelle Jones after reading this issue.

The only imperfection in this diamond is its unfortunate need to be placed in the setting of the fool’s gold ring that is Batman #50. Get past the first few pages, however, and you have one heck of a book that should be on everyone’s subscription list.

9/10

Batman #50 and Catwoman #1 releases on July 4, 2018!


Written by The Critic The Internet Deserves, but not the one it needs right now…. Matt Morrison. He’s a smart-ass guardian. A sarcastic protector. A Snark Knight.