SWAMP THING – Ep. 9 “The Anatomy Lesson” Review

After Swamp Thing was frozen and captured by Sunderland’s mercenaries, they take his body to Sunderland’s old concrete factory where he has Dr. Woodrue set up with a laboratory to study him. Meanwhile, Daniel is still in the hospital under restraint when the “studio man” comes to visit him and brings his Blue Devil mask. He also shows Daniel a vision of Abby and Liz getting shot by Sunderland’s mercenaries and leaves him little choice to try and save them to prevent the vision from coming true. Now that Dr. Woodrue has Swamp Thing, he lets him thaw out a little and begins to forcefully vivisect him and remove his organs. During the process, Swamp Thing awakens to the realization that Woodrue is dissecting him, but due to green spectrum lights, he is unable to regenerate and is at the mercy of the cruel doctor.

Now that Avery Sunderland is “back from the dead” he confronts Maria about her plans to take over his company with the Conclave, and has her committed to a psychiatric hospital. Having told Liz (and several others) about Alec, Abby and Liz discover where Sunderland is keeping him. But while Dr. Woodrue continues to analyze Swamp Thing’s body, he makes a surprising discovery about what Alec has really become.

This episode is by far the closest adaptation to the “Swamp Thing” comic book the show has presented, particularly Alan Moore’s 1984 story, also called “The Anatomy Lesson,” in ‘Saga of the Swamp Thing’ #21. For fans and readers of the original Swamp Thing, this issue marked a turning point in what would become Alan Moore’s seminal story arc. After taking over the series from writer Martin Pasko with issue #20, in which Sunderland (then a General) arranges to have Jason Woodrue (already a supervillain known as the Floronic Man, where he is instructed to examine the remains of the Swamp Thing after having been shot and thought to be dead.

Without spoiling the show or the comic reveal, know that this confirmed the changes that were made in volume 2 of “Saga of the Swamp Thing” which began in 1982 with the retelling of his origin, which also coincided with the release of the low-budget 1982 movie directed by Wes Craven (before making “A Nightmare on Elm Street”). As Swamp Thing has gone through several incarnations, including the New 52 storyline in 2011. This also shows that the series is following the comics closer to the comics than any previous series or movies have before, with some slight character changes.

“The Anatomy Lesson” is both the most intense and revealing episode in this short series, and with only one episode left, it’s hard to speculate where the show will leave off or if there will be any possibility of continuation or appearances in any other DC Universe show or movie in the future. I will be awaiting next week’s season/series finale with bittersweet anticipation.

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